Best Way to Whiten Teeth Naturally Recipe

Activated charcoal is used in products like supplements, soaps, shampoos, face masks, and even toothpastes. A black toothpaste may seem strange, but manufacturers claim that it can lead to brighter teeth. ‌

Nothing brightens or whitens teeth like Activated Charcoal.

What is activated charcoal?

Activated charcoal is very similar to the regular charcoal you can fire up your barbeque with, however it is specifically used for medical applications. It’s created by heating up charcoal using a gas that creates large pores in the mineral which trap chemicals.

Activated charcoal is more traditionally used to treat intestinal gas, cholestasis during pregnancy, and lower cholesterol levels. It is odourless, tasteless, and can be purchased from health food stores and pharmacies in the form of tablets.

How to use Activated Charcoal while brushing your teeth:

  1. Place a small amount of toothpaste on the toothbrush and dip it in some Activated Charcoal.
  2. Next just add just a little bit of water and begin to brush like normal.
  3. Don’t be frightened by the black messy substance in your mouth, it will not stain your teeth or skin.
  4. Rinse well… then rinse again.
  5. Do warned that Activated Charcoal can stain clothing, so be careful.
  6. This process will result in clean and bright teeth is beneficial  for the body not toxic.

Charred Willow Bark that has been subjected to an oxidizing gas at elevated temperatures.

Charcoal teeth whitening DIY

If you’d like to try activated charcoal to whiten your teeth, you can purchase it as a powder or in capsules that you open. Mix with water to make a paste. You can also try sprinkling the charcoal onto your wet finger or toothbrush.

Keep in mind that this technique may be hard to finesse. Activated charcoal can also stain fabrics and countertops.

  • Activated charcoal may damage any fillings, crowns, or other dental work. If you’ve had damaged or broken teeth repaired, talk to your dentist before trying activated charcoal toothpaste or tablets.

  • Do not attempt to use activated charcoal to whiten your teeth if you have gum disease, or if your gums typically bleed when you brush your teeth normally.

  • Consult your dentist before trying any at-home whitening methods to be sure that the method is safe for your teeth.

Image source: https://www.wikihow.com/Use-Activated-Charcoal-for-Teeth-Whitening

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7 Ways to Prep for a Wartime Economy

Prep for a Wartime Economy - 7 Ways to Prepare for Supply Chain Shortages

By the end of 2021, we experienced two new variants of the COVID pandemic (Delta & Omicron). There has been a decrease in housing inventory, causing home prices to soar to a 19.9% in value. The United States has experienced a 7% increase in inflation, a shortage of microchips affecting the supply of home appliances and electronic gear, favorite food items randomly going missing from stores periodically, coin shortages at local retailers, and emergency preparedness gear out of stock.   

In 2022, We see photos of destruction in Ukraine and war stories filtered through our news feeds. Our fuel prices are soaring, and food prices continue to climb. It can have a frightening effect! The U.S. has placed “severe sanctions” against Russia for attacking Ukraine. We can only speculate how Russia will respond and how these sanctions will affect the U.S. economy. Russia’s top exports are wheat, crude oilnatural gas, precious metals, fertilizer, and metals (iron, steel, copper, aluminum). 

It brings to mind questions like, is there a way to prep for a wartime economy? Am I prepared for higher food prices, grain shortages, stock market fluctuations, and a sense of peace despite economic changes? 

Peace comes from having a plan! If you have been gathering extra food and stocking away other essential survival gear, then the answer is YES! Being prepared takes planning. Will there be some inconveniences – SURE – but that is life! It is important not to get caught up in doomsday headlines. Below are seven ways to prep for a wartime economy and feel some measure of control during uncertain times.

 

7 Ways to Prep a Wartime Economy

 

1. Consider Ways to Use Less Gas

With sanctions on Russia, it is widely believed that we will continue to see fuel prices race upwards. We use gas in our cars, trucks, RVs, generators, and lawnmowers. A hefty increase in prices can devastate a household’s budget. Make simple changes now before you feel the hurt in your pocketbook. Meal plan and try consolidating all of your errands to fewer trips to the supermarket per month. Teardrop Trailers are in high demand. Gas-guzzling RVs are being traded for smaller, gas economic trailers. Electric bikes are another way you can minimize fuel costs. 

 

 

2. Stock Up On Grains

Russia is the #1 international exporter of wheat. Common food staples such as pasta, bread, and cereal are made of wheat. It was hard to find these food items during the start of the pandemic; most grocery stores couldn’t get these items on the shelves fast enough. Grains were sold out! Currently, most have restocked their inventory. So now is a good time to stock up on grains your family eats on a regular basis. Living…

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Playing Both Sides: Impact of Tech Industry on Early Federal AI Policy

By Ben Winters, EPIC Counsel

This week, Politico’s Alex Thompson detailed the close relationship between the Biden administration’s Office of Science and Technology Policy and Schmidt Futures, the philanthropic initiative of former Google CEO Eric Schmidt. The links between Schmidt Futures and Biden’s OSTP add to the already significant influence of Schmidt, who is heavily invested in AI companies, in crafting AI policy for the United States.

Politico’s piece explained how the organization indirectly paid the salaries of now-OSTP Chief of Staff Marc Aidinoff while he was working for the agency and had a similar arrangement for other OSTP staffers. Another OSTP staff member was urged by OSTP’s legal team to withdraw from a Schmidt Futures-funded fellowship. Politico also reported that “Twoother OSTP officials continued to work part-time at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT in Cambridge, Mass., a leading biotech facility that had been headed by [former OSTP Director Eric] Lander and where Schmidt chairs the board.”

The U.S. Government has not yet enacted legislation or dedicated substantial funding to protecting individuals from the threats that automated decision-making systems and AI pose to privacy rights or the discriminatory impacts they encode and exacerbate. Despite some agency steps toward protecting individuals—such as actions taken by the Federal Trade Commission and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission—a pair of largely unfulfilled Executive Orders and piecemeal enforcement has ensured that federal policy prioritizes AI development over the protection of rights. EPIC detailed this funding disparity in recent comments to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. EPIC advocates for building oversight, testing, and regulatory capacity to prevent, control and remediate AI harm.

The federal government has, however, created several influential advisory boards to help inform policy and funding decisions. One of these bodies was the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence, or NSCAI. The NSCAI was charged with “review[ing] advances in artificial intelligence, related machine learning developments, and associated technologies” and making policy recommendations to Congress and the President. The NSCAI, like the Defense Innovation Board, was chaired by Eric Schmidt and included executives of large tech companies that regularly vie for defense contracts such as Google, Oracle, and Amazon. These companies stand to profit from the recommendations the Commission made.

Although squarely covered by the Freedom of Information Act and the Federal Advisory Committee Act, which requires advisory committees to hold open public meetings, the NSCAI initially refused to comply with its transparency obligations. EPIC filed suit after the Commission failed to act on EPIC’s open government requests throughout its first year of operation. As a result of EPIC’s case, the Commission was ordered by a court to open its meetings and records to the public. As part of the Commission’s compliance with EPIC’s FOIA request, EPIC received several presentations from outside groups that informed some of the NSCAI’s report: one which framed U.S. AI policy in terms of direct competition with China and argued that the U.S. was lacking…

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Prepping Your Home for a Wartime Economy

Prepping Your Home for a Wartime Economy

By the end of 2021, we experienced two new variants of the COVID pandemic (Delta & Omicron); home prices have soared to a 19.9% increase in value, and there has been a decrease in housing inventory. We experienced a 7% increase in inflation, a shortage of microchips affecting the supply of home appliances and electronic gear, favorite food items randomly going missing from stores periodically, coin shortages at local retailers, and emergency preparedness gear out of stock.   

We see photos of destruction in Ukraine and war stories filtered through our news feeds. Our fuel prices are soaring, and food prices continue to climb. It can have a frightening effect! The U.S. has placed “severe sanctions” against Russia for attacking Ukraine. We can only speculate how Russia will respond and how these sanctions will affect the U.S. economy. Russia’s top exports are wheat, crude oilnatural gas, precious metals, fertilizer, and metals (iron, steel, copper, aluminum). 

It brings to mind questions like: am I prepared for higher prices, grain shortages, stock market fluctuations, or a host of other things. 

If you have been prepping (gathering food storage and stocking away other essential survival gear), then it’s possible that YES, you are prepared for whatever the future holds. Will there be some inconveniences – SURE – but that is life! It is important not to get caught up in doomsday headlines. Here are several ways to prep your home for a wartime economy and feel some measure of control during uncertain times.

 

Prepping Your Home for a Wartime Economy

 

1. Consider Ways to Use Less Gas

With sanctions on Russia, it is widely believed that we will continue to see fuel prices race upwards. We use gas in our cars, trucks, RVs, generators, and lawnmowers. A hefty increase in prices can devastate a household’s budget. Make simple changes now before you feel the hurt in your pocketbook. Meal plan and take one trip to the store a month instead of going once a week. Many preppers are trading in their gas-guzzling RVs for small Teardrop Trailers. Electric bikes are another way you can minimize fuel costs. Last year my household gas budget was $180 (I know that is much lower than most US households). I’m making budget adjustments now as prices continue to climb.

 

 

2. Stock Up On Grains

Did you know that Macaroni and Cheese were very popular during WWII? When dairy was rationed and in short supply during the war, a box of Mac & Cheese satisfied people’s cravings for the taste of cheese. Are you into sweet, spicy, crunchy, cheesy, chocolatey, or salty? Make sure you have some basic food staples stocked away, plus some foods that will curb a craving. I’ve been stashing a few boxes of brownies.

Russia is…

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EPIC Recommends CFPB Strengthen Buy Now Pay Later (BNPL) Market Inquiry on Customer Acquisition and Data Practices

EPIC has submitted comments applauding the Bureau’s inquiry into the growing Buy Now Pay Later (BNPL) alternative credit market, but urging the Bureau to inquire further into customer acquisition and data governance practices. Rohit Chopra, Director of the CFPB, described BNPL as “the new version of the old layaway plan, but with modern, faster twists where the consumer gets the product immediately but gets the debt immediately too.” BNPL consumers are typically lower-income, younger, and experience greater income volatility. Successfully paying off BNPL credit does not strengthen the consumer’s credit because BNPL is an alternative form of credit, however failure to pay can negatively impact a consumer’s traditional credit rating. EPIC explained that “business models predicated on using alternative data present a substantial risk for predatory practices.” EPIC’s recommendations included that the CFPB request more granular detail about BNPL providers’: customer targeting and acquisition programs; acquisition and use of consumer data; data minimization, retention, and deletion practices; and policies regarding consumer and third-party access to data and to provider decisions. EPIC regularly files comments and amicus briefs on matters related to consumer privacy, big data, and algorithmic accountability, especially in the context of determinations of creditworthiness.

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The National Law Review: Federal Court Dismisses Litigation Challenging U.S. Postal Service’s Use of Facial Recognition and Related Technologies

A federal court the end of last week dismissed a litigation challenging the U.S. Postal Service’s (“USPS”) use of facial recognition and related technologies to collect personal data, finding that the group which filed the claims lacked standing.  Electronic Privacy Information Center v. United States Postal Service et al., Case No. 1:21-cv-02156 (D.D.C.).  As it is anticipated the use of facial recognition and AI will continue to be challenged by plaintiffs and other parties in privacy litigations going forward, the resolution in this particular dispute is relevant for other cases, particularly insofar as government activity in this space is concerned.  Read on to learn more.

In August of last year the Electronic Privacy Information Center (“EPIC”) filed on behalf of itself and its members alleging that the USPS failed to comply with the E-Government Act.  This law, which was enacted in 2002, was designed to improve the Government’s use of information technology “in a manner consistent with laws regarding protection of personal privacy, national security . . . and other relevant laws.”  116 Stat. 2899, 2901 (2002) (Act), codified at 44 U.S.C. § 3501.

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Crop Plot Rotation In Very Small Spaces (Infographic)

In previous articles, we covered the concept of growing in guilds, or growing crops together that share common requirements. We also looked at the maximum efficiency of grouping three guilds or beds together to grow in what I call triads.

But we also know about the proven importance of plot rotation to soil health and crop resilience. In this application, too, the guild concept has notable advantages, especially for backyard gardeners who grow in very small spaces.

In the text and infographic below, let’s look at how growers can execute crop plot rotation in very small spaces.

Read more: Index guilds can help you learn about your soil and crops. Establish one this year for permaculture success.

1. Crop Rotation Schedule (below)

The crop rotation schedule for very small-scale growers will be the same as for other growers. The difference is the limited plot size.

For very small growers, this means most of the rotation groups are held in reserve over the years. These crops are only planted when it is their turn to occupy the very small garden space.

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crop rotation plot infographiccourtesy of Zach Loeks

2. Very Small Plot Crop Rotation (above)

A very small-scale backyard gardener may only grow a guild of one triad as their entire plot. Or maybe they grow up to three triads as their entire plot.

This limits the number of rotation groups that can actually practically grow in any one year.

As such the guild crop rotation is managed over the years by growing only one to three rotation groups each year. In this way the grower can also focus on a limited number of varieties each year for best management practices.

For instance managing disease on very small property becomes problematic if all crops are grown in a small plot at the same time each year. Why? Because there is always an adjacency issue.

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EPIC Joins Brennan Center Urging DHS Not to Mandate Social Media Disclosure

[]EPIC and the Brennan Center submitted comments in response to the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) request to require Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) applicants to disclose their social media identifiers. The organizations emphasized that federal agencies have not found social media screening to be effective for vetting immigrants and that the policy substantially threatens rights to expression, association, and privacy. The policy of collecting social media identifiers, which originated under President Trump’s Muslim Ban, is also likely to have a disparate impact on minority groups. Finally, the organizations argued that this policy would “contravene[] the Biden administration’s stated commitments to global free expression and privacy.” In 2019, EPIC joined a coalition opposing a DHS proposal to collect social media identifiers from immigrants and travelers, and in 2016 EPIC submitted comments opposing a similar DHS proposal.  

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Plant These Garden Crops In Early Spring

It may be the very early days of spring right at this moment, but time flies. Before you know it, your garden will be ready for action. But one challenge of planing crops in early spring is the lingering chilly temperatures. Some days it might be brilliantly warm and awesome, but the next day might be cool and cloudy. Plus, early season frosts may threaten to loiter long after the snow has melted. 

There’s no doubt that you’ll need to hold off planting cold-sensitive crops until the danger of frost has passed (hello, indoor tomato trays!), but many vegetables can handle the weather of early spring. On the seed packets of some of these varieties, you might have seen a phrase such as “plant as soon as the ground can be worked” or something similar, to indicate that these crops can be sown very early in the year. 

Let’s take a closer look at that phrase, and explore some of the early-spring crops you can look forward to getting in the ground right away this year. This is gardening for the impatient! 

When Is Soon?

So what does “as soon as the ground can be worked” really mean? Partly, it’s a temperature indication. In very cold climates, garden soil may actually freeze solid during much of the winter (sometimes down a few inches), so obviously folks in those regions must wait until the ground thaws before considering spring planting. (Though I did once successfully plant some late-autumn garlic well into December by literally breaking through a 1/2-inch surface layer of semi-frozen soil to reach the fluffy soil below.) 

But there’s a lot more to the phrase than just the absence of frost. Early spring often means overly wet soil—the type that can be worked into a ball with your hands. This doesn’t count as ground that can be worked. Instead, your best bet for success will come once the soil has dried sufficiently to be fluffy and crumbly.

Those two factors—warm and dry soil—are the basics that combine to form soil that is ready for planting. But if you enjoy bringing a scientific attitude to your gardening (maybe you routinely monitor your garden’s soil pH), a simple soil thermometer can help you determine if the soil temperature is within the range that your particular seed varieties prefer. 

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“As soon as the ground can be worked” plant choices include the following. 

Peas

Peas are wonderfully cold-hardy and can be planted from seeds as long as the soil temperature is above about 40 degrees F and below 70 degrees, basically any time after the ground has thawed. They thrive in cool temperatures and make an excellent early spring crop. Plant them as soon as you can!

If you’d like to experiment, try sowing pea seeds in the fall and allowing them overwinter in the soil. If you time this correctly, the seeds should lay dormant in the soil (it’s OK if they…

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Lexology: Federal Court Dismisses Litigation Challenging U.S. Postal Service’s Use of Facial Recognition and Related Technologies

A federal court the end of last week dismissed a litigation challenging the U.S. Postal Service’s (“USPS”) use of facial recognition and related technologies to collect personal data, finding that the group which filed the claims lacked standing. Electronic Privacy Information Center v. United States Postal Service et al., Case No. 1:21-cv-02156 (D.D.C.). As it is anticipated the use of facial recognition and AI will continue to be challenged by plaintiffs and other parties in privacy litigations going forward, the resolution in this particular dispute is relevant for other cases, particularly insofar as government activity in this space is concerned. Read on to learn more.

In August of last year the Electronic Privacy Information Center (“EPIC”) filed on behalf of itself and its members alleging that the USPS failed to comply with the E-Government Act. This law, which was enacted in 2002, was designed to improve the Government’s use of information technology “in a manner consistent with laws regarding protection of personal privacy, national security . . . and other relevant laws.” 116 Stat. 2899, 2901 (2002) (Act), codified at 44 U.S.C. § 3501.

Read more here.

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