Today is the birthday of Dr. Edward Teller, who co-invented the H-bomb…

Today is the birthday of Dr. Edward Teller, who co-invented the H-bomb and worked on the Manhattan Project. In his later years at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, he was often so deep in thought strolling through the Berkeley hills that he would become confused and disoriented. His assistants would have to go out looking for him.

Today is also the anniversary of the 2009 “Miracle On The Hudson” engines-out emergency water landing.

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 98 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. The photovoltaic power specialists at Quantum Harvest LLC  are providing a store-wide 10% off coupon. Depending on the model chosen, this could be worth more than $2000.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any of their one, two, or three-day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. A course certificate from onPoint Tactical for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses, excluding those restricted for military or government teams. Three-day onPoint courses normally cost $795,
  4. Two cases of Mountain House freeze-dried assorted entrees in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources (a $350 value),
  5. A $250 gift certificate good for any product from Sunflower Ammo,
  6. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.
  7. Two sets of The Civil Defense Manual, (in two volumes) — a $193 value — kindly donated by the author, Jack Lawson.

Second Prize:

  1. A Front Sight Lifetime Diamond Membership, providing lifetime free training at any Front Sight Nevada course, with no limit on repeating classes. This prize is courtesy of a SurvivalBlog reader who prefers to be anonymous.
  2. A Glock form factor SIRT laser training pistol and a SIRT AR-15/M4 Laser Training Bolt, courtesy of Next Level Training, that have a combined retail value of $589,
  3. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  4. A transferable $150 FRN purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun. There is no paperwork required for delivery of pre-1899 guns into most states, making them the last bastion of firearms purchasing privacy!

Third Prize:

  1. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  2. A Royal Berkey water filter, courtesy of Directive 21 (a $275 value),
  3. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC,
  4. A transferable $100 FRN purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun.

More than $725,000 worth of prizes have been awarded since we started running this contest. Round 98 ends on January 31st, so get busy writing and <a href="https://survivalblog.com/contact/"…

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What Are the Pros & Cons to Investing in Residential Solar Panels for Ontario Homeowners?

Solar Panels

How Do Residential Solar Panels Work?

Residential solar panel systems are becoming more popular in Ontario because they are cost effective and environmentally friendly sources of renewable energy. Not to mention, rooftop solar panel systems provide an attractive ROI proposition, especially considering how after installation they will work to cover your retrofit costs easily in less than 10 years. Ensuring a lifetime of savings for decades to come!

The basic principles for understanding how a residential solar panel system works are straightforward and easy to understand. Standard solar panels – or photovoltaics (PV) as they are technically called – generate an electric current by capturing particles of light, called photons, emitted from the sun. These photons then interrupt the electrons in the photovoltaic cells to generate an electric current that is transferred to wires leading to an inverter. After which point, the current is turned into alternating current (AC) power and distributed throughout your home by said inverter.

By switching to solar energy for your home, you’re not only making your house more valuable on the market, but also saving money on electricity bills, boosting the value of your property, and reducing your carbon emissions; aiding Canada in its fight against climate change. However, there are many solar power pros and cons that need to be taken into consideration before deciding on whether or not to install a residential solar panel system on your home. As such, this article works to shed some light on the major benefits and drawbacks to investing in residential solar panels for Ontario homeowners.

What are the Benefits of Installing Residential Solar Panels?

The benefits of solar energy are plentiful. It reduces your electric bill, raises the value of your home, reduces your carbon footprint – fighting annually rising electricity costs, and provides opportunities for earning some money back on your investment.

 One of the most significant pros to investing in a residential solar panel system for homeowners in Ontario, is that it could save you a ton of money on monthly energy bills, in that you are not required to source any electricity from your utility company. In fact, almost 100% of your home’s energy consumption needs should be offset with the installation of a residential solar panel system.

Moreover, solar energy is an environmentally friendly, renewable energy source that has many more added benefits including reduction in air pollution, increased local employment opportunities, and lower CO2 emissions for you and the whole family.

This resource provides a comprehensive list of the many benefits of solar power for you to keep in mind.

Reduced/Eliminate Electricity Bills:

When you choose to invest in a residential rooftop solar panel system in Ontario, you gain the ability to generate your own electricity and become less reliant on your utility company. Which in turn, lowers your electricity rate to a fixed/lower than market rate from the point of installation onward. A standard solar panel system typically has a 25 – 35 year lifespan, meaning that you can cut down your…

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Common Injuries People Get During Disasters

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Estimated reading time: 8 minutes

Common Injuries People Get During Disasters

According to a recent study by Wells Fargo, about 84 percent of Americans live in areas that have experienced a natural disaster in the past three years.

Of those respondents, 54 percent describe those events — including tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, or wildfires — as severe. And 72 percent of the respondents reported that their lives had been affected by a natural disaster at some point.

The growing frequency of natural disasters is taking its toll on all of us. In just the first nine months of 2021, 538 Americans died due to weather disasters, according to the Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). That number is double the number of deaths from disasters that occurred in 2020.

While we cannot predict when a natural disaster will strike, we can take steps to help prevent serious injury and death. This article will explore the common injuries people get in various natural disasters and how to treat them with basic first aid until you can get help.

Hurricanes, Tornadoes, and Floods

The most common injuries that occur during and after a severe storm include:

  • Infection from water that has been contaminated by sewage or toxic chemicals.
  • Wound infection from sharp objects and flying or floating debris
  • Injuries, cuts, scrapes, or broken bones from fallen trees, car accidents, or debris impact.
  • Mosquito-borne infections from stagnant water.

For cuts and scrapes:

  1. Apply pressure to control bleeding.
  2. Wash your hands before treating the wound.
  3. Then wash the wound with clean water or soap and water.
  4. Apply antibiotic ointment.
  5. Cover the area with a clean bandage.

If you are not able to clean the wound, it is best to leave it uncovered. A covered unclean wound is more likely to become infected. 

Examine the wound every 24 hours. Get medical help as soon as possible if the following signs of infection occur:

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Heat
  • Redness
  • Pus
  • Odor
  • Fever

Here is a video that shows basic first aid for treating a minor cut.

For broken bones, try to avoid moving the person if possible. Movement can cause further injury. Follow these steps while you wait for medical help:

  • Stop any bleeding by applying pressure to the wound with a clean cloth or bandage.
  • Immobilize the injured area. Do not try to push or realign a bone. You can apply a splint to the area above and below the injured site. Padding the splints can help reduce pain and discomfort.
  • Wrap ice or an ice pack in a cloth before applying to the injured area to reduce pain and swelling.
  • Watch out for signs of shock. If the person is breathing in short, rapid breaths or feels faint, help them to lie down with their head slightly lower than their torso and elevate their legs if you can.

This video demonstrates how to apply a leg splint in an emergency:

Severe Winter Weather 

If you are stranded outside due to a blizzard or other winter weather-related…

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This is the birthday of actor and shooter Robert Stack (1919-2003.)

This is the birthday of actor and shooter Robert Stack (1919-2003.)

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 98 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. The photovoltaic power specialists at Quantum Harvest LLC  are providing a store-wide 10% off coupon. Depending on the model chosen, this could be worth more than $2000.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any of their one, two, or three-day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. A course certificate from onPoint Tactical for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses, excluding those restricted for military or government teams. Three-day onPoint courses normally cost $795,
  4. Two cases of Mountain House freeze-dried assorted entrees in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources (a $350 value),
  5. A $250 gift certificate good for any product from Sunflower Ammo,
  6. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.
  7. Two sets of The Civil Defense Manual, (in two volumes) — a $193 value — kindly donated by the author, Jack Lawson.

Second Prize:

  1. A Front Sight Lifetime Diamond Membership, providing lifetime free training at any Front Sight Nevada course, with no limit on repeating classes. This prize is courtesy of a SurvivalBlog reader who prefers to be anonymous.
  2. A Glock form factor SIRT laser training pistol and a SIRT AR-15/M4 Laser Training Bolt, courtesy of Next Level Training, that have a combined retail value of $589,
  3. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  4. A transferable $150 FRN purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun. There is no paperwork required for delivery of pre-1899 guns into most states, making them the last bastion of firearms purchasing privacy!

Third Prize:

  1. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  2. A Royal Berkey water filter, courtesy of Directive 21 (a $275 value),
  3. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC,
  4. A transferable $100 FRN purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun.

More than $725,000 worth of prizes have been awarded since we started running this contest. Round 98 ends on January 31st, so get busy writing and e-mail us your entry. Remember that there is a 1,500-word minimum, and that articles on practical “how-to” skills for survival have an advantage in the judging.

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13 Prepper Items to Look for at the Salvation Army

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Estimated reading time: 6 minutes

13 Prepper Items to Look for at the Salvation Army

There’s no doubt about it, prepping can be expensive. That’s one of the things that keeps people from starting in the first place. Those of us who have been at it a while have found ways of cutting those costs, making prepping at least a little less expensive. Depending on one’s ability to use their imagination and the disasters they’re prepping for, it’s possible to save quite a bit of money on prepping. 

One of the keys to saving money is having the imagination to repurpose items. Many things which have been designed and manufactured for one purpose will work just as well for another. A wooden children’s play wagon works just as well as a yard cart as the ones made specifically for the purpose, once the kids get too old to enjoy it. Then there are five-gallon paint buckets, which can be used for a myriad of purposes besides just holding unused paint. 

Getting those items used at the Salvation Army is even better, allowing you to save money. There’s no sense buying things for full price if you don’t have to. Better to save the money so it can be used for other things. That will help your prepping efforts to go faster. 

The Salvation Army is a great source for a wide variety of things, for those who have the patience to go there regularly to see what comes in. A lot of the best stuff goes quickly, so unless you check back regularly, there’s a good chance that the things you need will disappear before you can buy them. 

So what sorts of things should you be looking for at your local Salvation Army? 

Canning Jars

One of the best things to look for in any second-hand store or even a garage sale is canning jars. If you are gardening and canning your own food as part of your prepping, you probably need lots of canning supplies. But what you’re using now is nothing compared to what you’ll be using when you’re growing all your food. Canning in a post-disaster world will become a way of life. 

Candles

Candles are another thing to be constantly keeping an eye out for. People buy decorative candles all the time, then get rid of them when they start getting beat up. I’ve seen such candles go for as little as a quarter a piece. They’re great for melting down and making into survival candles; putting them in a spaghetti sauce jar with four wicks per candle. The jar keeps the wicks dry and the multiple wicks allow for more light, when it is needed. 

Candlesticks 

Some of those candles might be tapers. While I’m not a big fan of using tapers for survival, they’ll work, if you’ve got candlesticks to put them in. As candlesticks aren’t…

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January 12 1879, the British-Zulu War began. British troops invaded Zululand…

January 12 1879, the British-Zulu War began. British troops, under Lieutenant General Frederic Augustus, invaded Zululand from the southern African Republic of Natal.

On this day in 1737: John Hancock was born. He was the first signer of the Declaration of Independence.

A USB Stick Update: The first batch of 1,000 waterproof/EMP-resistant 2005–2021 SurvivalBlog Archive USB sticks sold out in just four days! We are now taking backorders on a second batch of 500 sticks. Deliveries of the first batch will begin in mid-February. Deliveries of the second batch will begin on or around March 1st.

SurvivalBlog Writing Contest

Today we present another entry for Round 98 of the SurvivalBlog non-fiction writing contest. The prizes for this round include:

First Prize:

  1. The photovoltaic power specialists at Quantum Harvest LLC  are providing a store-wide 10% off coupon. Depending on the model chosen, this could be worth more than $2000.
  2. A Gunsite Academy Three Day Course Certificate. This can be used for any of their one, two, or three-day course (a $1,095 value),
  3. A course certificate from onPoint Tactical for the prize winner’s choice of three-day civilian courses, excluding those restricted for military or government teams. Three-day onPoint courses normally cost $795,
  4. Two cases of Mountain House freeze-dried assorted entrees in #10 cans, courtesy of Ready Made Resources (a $350 value),
  5. A $250 gift certificate good for any product from Sunflower Ammo,
  6. American Gunsmithing Institute (AGI) is providing a $300 certificate good towards any of their DVD training courses.
  7. Two sets of The Civil Defense Manual, (in two volumes) — a $193 value — kindly donated by the author, Jack Lawson.

Second Prize:

  1. A Front Sight Lifetime Diamond Membership, providing lifetime free training at any Front Sight Nevada course, with no limit on repeating classes. This prize is courtesy of a SurvivalBlog reader who prefers to be anonymous.
  2. A Glock form factor SIRT laser training pistol and a SIRT AR-15/M4 Laser Training Bolt, courtesy of Next Level Training, that have a combined retail value of $589,
  3. Two 1,000-foot spools of full mil-spec U.S.-made 750 paracord (in-stock colors only) from www.TOUGHGRID.com (a $240 value).
  4. A transferable $150 FRN purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun. There is no paperwork required for delivery of pre-1899 guns into most states, making them the last bastion of firearms purchasing privacy!

Third Prize:

  1. Three sets each of made-in-USA regular and wide-mouth reusable canning lids. (This is a total of 300 lids and 600 gaskets.) This prize is courtesy of Harvest Guard (a $270 value)
  2. A Royal Berkey water filter, courtesy of Directive 21 (a $275 value),
  3. Two Super Survival Pack seed collections, a $150 value, courtesy of Seed for Security, LLC,
  4. A transferable $100 FRN purchase credit from Elk Creek Company, toward the purchase of any pre-1899 antique gun.

More…

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The Ultimate SHTF Plan From An Army Vet

As a veteran, specifically an Army veteran, I find that my view of survival is different from people who have never served in the armed forces. While my personal journey as a survivalist began before my time in the service; that just meant that my time in the Army became part of my survival education. As such, the two play off each other, with my military training altering my view on survival and my survival mindset affecting how I viewed military service.

In the military there are three categories of people: friendlies, foes and non-combatants. But non-combatants can’t be assumed to be friendly or safe. They may very well be agents provocaturs for the other side, helping the enemy, while remaining under the cover of not being seen as a threat. This was a serious problem during both Gulf Wars, so anyone who is not a friendly has to be looked at as a potential threat.

When it comes to survival, we’re dealing with two enemies at once: whatever nature has thrown at us and all the unprepared people out there. Not all of those people are going to turn into enemies, but the possibility exists that any of them can. That’s something that has to constantly be in the back of your mind.

A preemptive attack is not an option, as part of the military ethos is to protect the innocent and attacking might move them from the neutral column into the enemy column. At the same time, it is foolish to not recognize the danger that those people can become when they are desperate.

Location is Key

Being from the Army, I’m all but compelled to look at any survival situation as one in which I have to be able to defend myself. While I hope to avoid confrontation, I don’t really believe that is possible. Therefore, I see picking the right location as key to survival. I’m not talking about a survival retreat that I would bug out to; I’m talking about my primary residence, where I expect to be when the SHTF.

The Ultimate SHTF Plan From An Army VetAs far as I’m concerned, being in the city is a big mistake. There are just too many people for comfort.

Each of those people are a potential threat and developing a defensive plan that allows me to protect my family from all of them would require a company of infantry.

Following my military training, I’d set up my home camp in a small town, where there are many fewer threats, unless I can set up my home camp out in the boondocks, where nobody could find me.

Related: Home Security Tips From A Military Expert

If you have to live in the city, then go for a combination of low population density, while being on the high ground. The high ground is always an advantage, defensively speaking and a lower population density means a smaller attack force, should…

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Equality and Fairness for All but Property Owners

The grossly misnamed Equality Act is a government attack on the rights of private property, freedom of assembly, freedom of association, free enterprise, and freedom of contract. According to the official summary of bill (H.R.5):

This bill prohibits discrimination based on sex, sexual orientation, and gender identity in areas including public accommodations and facilities, education, federal funding, employment, housing, credit, and the jury system. Specifically, the bill defines and includes sex, sexual orientation, and gender identity among the prohibited categories of discrimination or segregation.

The bill expands the definition of public accommodations to include places or establishments that provide (1) exhibitions, recreation, exercise, amusement, gatherings, or displays; (2) goods, services, or programs; and (3) transportation services.

The bill allows the Department of Justice to intervene in equal protection actions in federal court on account of sexual orientation or gender identity.

The bill prohibits an individual from being denied access to a shared facility, including a restroom, a locker room, and a dressing room, that is in accordance with the individual’s gender identity.

Not surprisingly, the Equality Act is supported by the usual left-wing suspects like the ACLU, the Anti-Defamation League, the Southern Poverty Law Center, the NAACP, the AARP, and the National Organization for Women, the American Federation of Teachers, NARAL, Planned Parenthood, the American Psychological Association, and LGBTQ rights groups. But it is also supported by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and many of America’s largest companies, including Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Twitter, Google, Microsoft, eBay, Starbucks, Kellogg’s, and Johnson & Johnson. It even has the support of some religious denominations and groups, including the Episcopal Church, the United Methodist Church, the United Church of Christ, and the Interfaith Alliance.

The Equality Act has been languishing in the U.S. Senate since March 1 of this year. It was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives on February 18 and passed just a week later by a vote of 224–206. Every Democrat in the House voted in favor of the bill, but only three Republicans did. Although as of this writing, the Senate has not yet acted on it, the bill has a good chance of passing in the second session of the 117th Congress when Democrats see the handwriting on the wall that spells out “Republican landslide” in the 2022 midterm elections. The Republican alternative to the Equality Act, the equally misnamed Fairness for All Act, is no alternative at all if property rights mean anything.

Background

To understand the Equality Act, we must begin with the Civil Rights Act of 1964. It claimed to be:

An act to enforce the constitutional right to vote, to confer jurisdiction upon the district courts of the United States of America to provide injunctive relief against discrimination in public accommodations, to authorize the Attorney General to institute suits to protect constitutional rights in public facilities and public education, to extend the Commission on Civil Rights, to prevent discrimination in federally assisted programs, to establish a Commission on Equal Employment Opportunity, and for other…

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Navigation Tips for the Directionally Challenged

For some people, there is no such thing as getting lost. Those are the kinds of people who can easily find their way around a city as they can in a natural setting. Let me start by saying I am not one of those people. However, my husband is. Over the years, I have gleaned both insights and experiences that can help the directionally challenged.

Preparing to Navigate

In one sense, many of the problems associated with being directionally challenged come from both your perception and those of the people around you. Unfortunately, when your expectations of yourself and your abilities decrease, then you will do worse and wind up creating your reality. Before you go out for a walk or get behind the wheel, it is essential to be relaxed and in a positive mental state.

Here are some things that will make it easier to feel comfortable:

  • First, don’t automatically believe that navigating in unusual directions (aka “getting lost”) will always cost time and effort without any reasonable return. I’ve discovered all sorts of excellent shortcuts, stores, and other places that turned out to be very useful later on. Even if you do wind up spending more time right now on a navigation issue, it could easily save you time and money later on if you pay attention to what is around you and what you can learn from it.
  • Second, accept the fact that you may be re-routed from a known path to a destination or that you may wind up getting off track for some other reason. Start early rather than leaving yourself just enough time to get to your destination. At a minimum, leave yourself one hour for every 15 minutes of expected travel (I’ll explain why later). This way, even if you make it to your destination in the expected time, you have plenty of time to relax and prepare for whatever you are planning to do at your destination. For example, years ago, when I commute from a country setting into the city, I started at least one hour early. Since there was a gym near my workplace, I purchased a subscription and spent 45 minutes there before going into work on the days when I had no navigation problems.
  • Third, make sure you are focused and relaxed. Turn off the cell phone, the radio, and anything else that will make you feel stressed. If you tend to look at the dashboard clock and get stressed by the time passing, put a piece of tape over it. When you are in the car, you should focus entirely on your driving. At most, use some music from CDs or other sources that won’t have commercials or other interruptions that will spoil your mood. Unless you are driving in bad weather or need to know about the traffic ahead, it is best to keep the radio off. If you must listen for these…

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Keep the “Land Monitoring and Corrective Action Form” at Your Fingertips – to Prevent Problems and Create Profits

The Soil Learning Center is a hub of resources for farmers & growers who are on the regenerative journey. A platform created by soil lovers at Farming Secrets Media Group.

The goal of Soil Learning Center is just that: creating a central online space bringing together resources, education, content and inspiration, to better your growing practices, boost profits and product quality with an emphasis on sustainability and promote freedom from climate change.

For today’s modern farmers, you can’t afford to not know about regenerative farming and how these practices can help you succeed. 

We’ll also discuss successful stories from other farmers and growers who have found their unique solutions using nature’s tools with this new form of agriculture. 

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