FCW: Login.gov is getting new anti-fraud tools, but privacy advocate raises concerns

However, there remains apprehension around issues of privacy and accuracy, said Jake Wiener, Counsel at the Electronic Privacy Information Center. 

It is a “huge concern that they’re using LexisNexis,” which “is in the upper echelon of data brokers who suck in massive amounts of information, almost always without meaningful consent from the people whose information they’re collecting, and then sell it back to the government and private companies,” he said.

Read more here: https://fcw.com/digital-government/2022/11/logingov-getting-new-anti-fraud-tools-privacy-advocate-raises-concerns/380159/

Continue reading

The following recipe for Roasted Squash Seeds is from Mrs. Alaska.

The following recipe for Roasted Squash Seeds is from SurvivalBlog Mrs. Alaska. She writes:

“Why throw out the seeds of winter squash like butternut, acorn, spaghetti, and pumpkin!  You can roast them for a tasty seasonal snack. Or you feed them to poultry or save them to sow, next year.

For personal eating, I consider pumpkin seeds too woody a texture to be palatable (but I love pepitas, which are hulled pumpkin seeds).

The smaller, thinner seeds of other squash have a better texture and good flavor.  Here is how to roast squash seeds.

1)      Scoop out the seeds.

2)      Dump them into a tepid/warm salt water solution.  1 tsp per two cups of water is fine.

Note: The salinity slightly flavors the seeds but more importantly, breaks down the phytic acid (that preserves seeds until germination) so that the nutrients in the roasted seeds will be more bio-available to humans.  The soak also helps separate some of the slimy pulp from the seeds.

3)      Several hours later or the next day, pour the seeds into a colander.   Rinse, to help remove more pulp and to remove salt if you do not want that as a flavoring agent.

4)      Let the seeds dry out overnight.  You can’t roast wet seeds.  (I leave them in the colander in a cold oven). Do not dry them on a paper towel.  They will stick to the fabric.

COOKING:

In The Oven:

  1. Spread the dry seeds in a pan with sides (because some may pop and jump when hot).  Drizzle LIGHTLY with oil (olive, sesame, other) and sprinkle with flavoring agents of choice, such as salt, cayenne, Italian herbs, curry, cumin, etc.  Mix well.  Spread out in a single layer.
  2. I have read recipes that suggest roasting at 350 or 375 degrees for 10-15 minutes. However, this is too hot and too long for seeds more delicate than pumpkin.  I prefer a slower oven – about 325 degrees.  Stir/check color and scent about every 10 minutes.  Since I dry them overnight, I cook them in the oven while I am making breakfast.

On Your Stovetop:

  1. Same as above: single layer, drizzled with oil and flavorings, stirred occasionally, monitor timing and temperature.  I do not do this anymore because of the occasional seeds that pop out of the pan.  Not a big deal.  Just my preference.
  2. The roasted seeds will crisp up more when cool.

Mrs. Alaska blogs at: Alaskauu1.blogspot.com

Do you have a favorite recipe that would be of interest to SurvivalBlog readers? In this weekly recipe column, we place emphasis on recipes that use long term storage foods, recipes for wild game, dutch oven and slow cooker recipes, and any that use home garden produce. If you have any favorite recipes, then please send them via e-mail. Thanks!

Continue reading

Woven Pipe Cleaner Cans To Make With The Kids | Homesteading Simple Self Sufficient Off-The-Grid

Woven Pipe Cleaner Cans To Make With The Kids | Homesteading Simple Self Sufficient Off-The-Grid | Homesteading.com <![CDATA[ window._wpemojiSettings = {"baseUrl":"https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/14.0.0/72×72/","ext":".png","svgUrl":"https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/14.0.0/svg/","svgExt":".svg","source":{"concatemoji":"https://homesteading.com/wp-includes/js/wp-emoji-release.min.js?ver=6.0.3"}}; /*! This file is auto-generated */ !function(e,a,t){var n,r,o,i=a.createElement("canvas"),p=i.getContext&&i.getContext("2d");function s(e,t){var a=String.fromCharCode,e=(p.clearRect(0,0,i.width,i.height),p.fillText(a.apply(this,e),0,0),i.toDataURL());return p.clearRect(0,0,i.width,i.height),p.fillText(a.apply(this,t),0,0),e===i.toDataURL()}function c(e){var t=a.createElement("script");t.src=e,t.defer=t.type="text/javascript",a.getElementsByTagName("head")[0].appendChild(t)}for(o=Array("flag","emoji"),t.supports={everything:!0,everythingExceptFlag:!0},r=0;r tallest) { tallest = thisHeight; } }); group.height(tallest); } equalHeight($(“.dg-grid-shortcode .dg_grid-shortcode-col”)); $(window).resize(function() { equalHeight($(“.dg-grid-shortcode .dg_grid-shortcode-col”)); }); }); ]]>

Continue reading here

Picking Edible & Medicinal Plants – Must Know Rules | Homesteading Simple Self Sufficient Off-The-Grid

Picking Edible & Medicinal Plants – Must Know Rules | Homesteading Simple Self Sufficient Off-The-Grid | Homesteading.com <![CDATA[ window._wpemojiSettings = {"baseUrl":"https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/14.0.0/72×72/","ext":".png","svgUrl":"https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/14.0.0/svg/","svgExt":".svg","source":{"concatemoji":"https://homesteading.com/wp-includes/js/wp-emoji-release.min.js?ver=6.0.3"}}; /*! This file is auto-generated */ !function(e,a,t){var n,r,o,i=a.createElement("canvas"),p=i.getContext&&i.getContext("2d");function s(e,t){var a=String.fromCharCode,e=(p.clearRect(0,0,i.width,i.height),p.fillText(a.apply(this,e),0,0),i.toDataURL());return p.clearRect(0,0,i.width,i.height),p.fillText(a.apply(this,t),0,0),e===i.toDataURL()}function c(e){var t=a.createElement("script");t.src=e,t.defer=t.type="text/javascript",a.getElementsByTagName("head")[0].appendChild(t)}for(o=Array("flag","emoji"),t.supports={everything:!0,everythingExceptFlag:!0},r=0;r tallest) { tallest = thisHeight; } }); group.height(tallest); } equalHeight($(“.dg-grid-shortcode .dg_grid-shortcode-col”)); $(window).resize(function() { equalHeight($(“.dg-grid-shortcode .dg_grid-shortcode-col”)); }); }); ]]>

Continue reading here

Video RoundUp: 5 Favorite Hobby Farms Stories

Here at Hobby Farms, we do our best to help out folks trying to make their way out there—whether that’s keeping a few laying hens and a lettuce patch in the suburbs; subsisting off the land in an off-grid setup; or selling homegrown organic summer squash at the local farmers market. We’re here to tell stories of people like you, and share tips and expertise for doing things efficiently, sustainably and enjoyably.

Of course, we’re proud to offer this information in the pages of our benchmark magazines, Hobby Farms and Chickens, not to mention our fleet of full-color annual publications such as Hobby Farm Home and Healing Herbs.

We’re always live here at hobbyfarms.com with exclusive articles from our team of experienced contributors. And in recent years we’ve expanded into podcasting with the launch of Hobby Farms Presents: Growing Good, a podcast with and about hobby farmers, small-scale growers and sustainable farmers.

But did you know that, in addition to all this, Hobby Farms offers an ever-growing collection of video articles on a wide variety of farming-related topics right here and over on YouTube? We do!

We absolutely encourage you to check out all of the video content Hobby Farms provides our readers. And to get you started, here are five of our favorite video stories from the past year that you may have missed!

Clipping Chicken Wings

Subscribe now

You can clip the flight feathers on your chickens’ wings to limit birds’ mobility and ability to get into trouble around the farm. It’s easy, painless and helpful. Bevin Cohen put together the video above to show us how it’s done.

What the Hay Is Up with Hay Prices?

Quality forage got harder to find this year, while hay prices soared through the roof. Josh and Rachel Porter of Porter Valley Ranch looked into what was going on and delivered tips for feeding livestock all winter long.

A Fall Tree-Planting Tutorial

Fall is the perfect time to plant trees, and the process is pretty simple. In this video Russell Graves provides a few pointers for putting new trees into the ground in the autumn months.

Sew a Feed Bag Shopping Tote

From chicken feed to bird seed, the empty plastic bags add up—but they don’t have to end up in the landfill. Longtime contributor Susan Brackney shows how to make your own fun and sustainable feed-bag tote.

Support Winter Wellness with Herbs

It’s important to maintain health on the homestead year-round and especially during winter. Bevin Cohen shows us how to use herbs and activities in the colder months to stay in tip-top shape!

Continue reading here

Recognizing And Dealing With Shock

Shock can have many different meanings. A movie’s plot twist could be shocking to some. Touching a live wire could result in a shock. You may be in shock as a result of the death of a loved one or as a result of trauma. Shock, in my opinion, is a terrifying term that predicts poor outcomes despite our best medical efforts.

Despite the best medical care in the best hospitals, mortality rates can range from 40% to 50%.

What will you do if your partner or family member is involved in an accident or suffers a heart attack and goes into shock?

The most important aspect of treating shock is learning to recognize it as soon as possible. The earlier the diagnosis, the sooner the treatment can begin.

What is shock?

To begin, shock is defined as a lack of blood and oxygen supply to the tissues. Tissues and cells starve as a result of a lack of these nutrients. When this happens, the tissues and organs stop working.

The greater the number of organ failures, the higher the mortality rate. The sooner the cells’ nutrients and function are restored, the better their chances of survival.

In order to minimize cell damage, the body has several mechanisms in place to compensate for the lack of tissue perfusion.

Although many organ systems are involved in compensatory mechanisms, the cardiovascular system is the process’s foundation.

A pump (the heart), pipes (the blood vessels), and fluid are required for the cardiovascular system to maintain its pressure in a closed loop (the blood).

In order to minimize cell damage, the body has several mechanisms in place to compensate for the lack of tissue perfusion. Even though many organ systems are involved in compensatory mechanisms, the cardiovascular system is the process’s foundation.

A pump (the heart), pipes (the blood vessels), and fluid are required for the cardiovascular system to maintain somewhat constant pressure in a closed loop (the blood). If any of these components fail, there is a loss of pressure in the system.

If the pressure loss is severe, the tissues and organs will not be nourished with the necessary components for proper organ and body function. Let’s dig a little deeper into this.

what is shock

The pump output (cardiac output) and systemic vascular resistance control the pressure in the system (changes in vessel diameter or changes in blood viscosity).

The heart rate and stroke volume determine cardiac output (how much blood is pumped with each contraction of the heart). The formula is as follows:

Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) = Cardiac Output (CO) x Systemic Vascular Resistance (SVR)

Cardiac Output = Heart Rate (HR) x Stroke Volume (SV) Therefore, MAP = (HR x SV) x SVR

To increase systemic pressure, we must either increase heart rate, stroke volume, or systemic vascular resistance (or some combination of the three). When one of these components fails as a result of an…

Continue reading

6 Things You Should Incorporate in Your Routine | Homesteading Simple Self Sufficient Off-The-Grid

6 Things You Should Incorporate in Your Routine | Homesteading Simple Self Sufficient Off-The-Grid | Homesteading.com <![CDATA[ window._wpemojiSettings = {"baseUrl":"https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/14.0.0/72×72/","ext":".png","svgUrl":"https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/14.0.0/svg/","svgExt":".svg","source":{"concatemoji":"https://homesteading.com/wp-includes/js/wp-emoji-release.min.js?ver=6.0.3"}}; /*! This file is auto-generated */ !function(e,a,t){var n,r,o,i=a.createElement("canvas"),p=i.getContext&&i.getContext("2d");function s(e,t){var a=String.fromCharCode,e=(p.clearRect(0,0,i.width,i.height),p.fillText(a.apply(this,e),0,0),i.toDataURL());return p.clearRect(0,0,i.width,i.height),p.fillText(a.apply(this,t),0,0),e===i.toDataURL()}function c(e){var t=a.createElement("script");t.src=e,t.defer=t.type="text/javascript",a.getElementsByTagName("head")[0].appendChild(t)}for(o=Array("flag","emoji"),t.supports={everything:!0,everythingExceptFlag:!0},r=0;r tallest) { tallest = thisHeight; } }); group.height(tallest); } equalHeight($(“.dg-grid-shortcode .dg_grid-shortcode-col”)); $(window).resize(function() { equalHeight($(“.dg-grid-shortcode .dg_grid-shortcode-col”)); }); }); ]]>

Continue reading here

How the Middle-Class Dining Room Revolutionized Domestic Life

For families and friends gathering for Thanksgiving dinner this year, chances are that many of them will gather at some point in rooms called the “dining room.” For most middle-class Americans, maintaining a formal dining room for ritualized forms of entertainment popular decades ago is no longer especially popular. Yet, most homes still have a room separate from the kitchen for meals with larger gatherings or when the entire immediate family assembles. A 2016 survey, for example, suggested that 78 percent of American homes have a dining room. Unlike with bedrooms and kitchens, however, interior designers and builders have debated for thirty years whether or not dining rooms are really necessary. Some contend they are “wasted” space. Others say that the dining room is “making a comeback” as people stubbornly continue to embrace the importance of family and friends sharing meals together in a setting slightly more structured than the act of grabbing toast and coffee in the kitchen before work. 

Perhaps more so than any other day of the year, Thanksgiving day is the day when the dining room is least “wasted” and most useful. It does indeed provide that extra space in which a larger number of guests can be comfortably accommodated for what historians call “domestic sociability.” That is, since the rituals of Thanksgiving day are generally performed within a domestic setting, a dining room can prove to be very useful indeed. 

The Dining Room Is a Recent Addition

In our modern age in which many families eat out at restaurants several nights per week, and public activities at entertainment venues are extremely common, the importance of domestic sociability is often overlooked. Yet, as Thanksgiving demonstrates, the act of gathering and socializing in a private home remains important for many families. Moreover, in times of economic downturns, domestic entertainment and social gathering becomes more important because it is relatively more affordable.

In a certain sense, those who think of the dining room as unnecessary are right. The dining room is a very late addition to homes. Even among the wealthy, dining rooms were rare until the seventeenth century, and even then, the room was not often seen outside of northwestern Europe. The wealthy certainly had large rooms for feasting, but these were often used for a wide variety of gatherings, and the public nature of the space makes them unlike private dining rooms. By the late Middle Ages, many meals were eaten in taverns and inns, but these areas, of course, were not private dining rooms either. It is only after 1700 that we begin to read of ordinary people finding ways to entertain friends and neighbors within their homes in these new spaces that would come to be known as dining rooms.

The Economics of Dining Rooms

To abolish the dining room would thus be a return to the “tradition” or a pre-industrial age when homes were smaller and living spaces tended to consist of one or two large multipurpose rooms devoted to everything from…

Continue reading

Comparison, The Thief of Joy

If you’re new here, you may want to subscribe to my RSS feed. Thanks for visiting!

(Psst: The FTC wants me to remind you that this website contains affiliate links. That means if you make a purchase from a link you click on, I might receive a small commission. This does not increase the price you’ll pay for that item nor does it decrease the awesomeness of the item. ~ Daisy)

By the author of The Faithful Prepper and Zombie Choices

 

I woke up with a start

Because today, it was the day!

Turkey, corn, taters too

And I’d just like to say

 

My attitude quickly soured

As I walked down the stairs

For as I walked amongst the preps

All stacked deep in layers

 

“I need more cans. This radio’s old.”

“And I’ve got to have more books!”

“Look at this old charcoal.”

“I still hope it cooks!”

 

“This Kelly Kettle has a ding.”

“This battery? Probably dead.”

“And I’ll be too when it’s post-apoc”

“Unless I buy more lead!”

 

“These med supplies, they’re not legit.”

“Just stuff from Dollar Store”

“The fancy stuff is where it’s at”

So I tossed them on the floor.

 

All these preps, all this stuff

But these thoughts were in my mind

Sure, yeah, it was cool.

But my stash was way behind.

 

“My buddy has more. This isn’t enough!”

“And I lost my old bee hive!”

“If I don’t pick up all this slack”

“My family won’t survive!”

 

“Look at these guys on Youtube!”

“Think of my buddy, Bob.”

“They’ve got more ammo, food, and guns.”

“And they make me feel a slob.”

 

“They’ve shelves and bins, a storage room”

“That must’ve cost eight grand.”

“If you cannot match Pinterest”

“If it’s not name brand”

 

“Then are you really prepping?”

“Or just collecting junk?”

My dissatisfaction with it all

Had put me in a funk

 

My new knife wasn’t cool as Bob’s

To his, mine was just a toy

Comparison had snuck on in

It is the thief of joy

 

I hopped into my truck

Just to get out. Clear my head.

Drove through the morning fog

Might pick up a loaf of bread.

 

I wandered through the backroads

The chill air whipping by

Upset with all I didn’t have

Falling for a lie

 

The grocery store was open

The clerks weren’t happy there

I was off and they were not

To them, it wasn’t fair.

 

Then as I drove out the lot

A tent, nestled among trees

An old man was sitting there

Trying not to freeze

 

His beard was grizzled as his face

A weather-beaten man

His clothes were falling all apart

And his skin was leather tan

 

I continued driving on

Somewhat shocked by what I saw

There’d been more homeless

Than there were last fall

 

I stopped to get a little gas

That truck can drink…

Continue reading here

Homeowner’s Guide To Garden Pest Control

Are pests taking Are pests taking over your garden? Are you having trouble getting rid of them? Don’t worry, you’re not alone. Many homeowners struggle with pest control in their gardens. In this blog post, we will discuss some common garden pests and how to get rid of them. We will also provide tips on how to prevent pests from taking over your garden in the first place!

Types of Pests

There are many different types of garden pests, including insects, fungi, rodents, and more. Some of the most common include.

Beetles

Beetles are one of the most common types of garden pests. This pest can damage plants by eating leaves, flowers, and stems.

Caterpillars

Caterpillars are another type of insect that can wreak havoc in your garden. These pests feed on foliage and can quickly devour large portions of plants. They are also capable of destroying flowers, fruits, and vegetables.

Cutworms

Cutworms are the larvae of several different kinds of night-flying moths. They get their name from their habit of “cutting” young plants off at the ground level.

Slugs

Slugs love cool, damp conditions, so they’re often found in gardens in spring and fall. These slimy creatures can decimate a crop in no time flat, so it’s important to take action as soon as you see them.

Ants

Ants are small insects that live in colonies consisting of one queen and many workers. They vary in color but are typically black or red. Ants damage gardens by eating seeds, young plants, and fruits.

Tips To Keep Garden Pests Out of the Garden

It’s not always easy to prevent pests from invading your garden. However, there are a few things you can do to reduce the chances of an infestation.

Plan wisely

One of the best ways to deter pests is to choose plants that they don’t like. If you’re not sure which plants are on a pest’s menu, do some research or ask your local nursery. Once you know which plants to stay away from, you can plan your garden accordingly.

You can also try planting certain herbs, like basil and mint, which tend to repel pests.

Be proactive

If you notice pests starting to take over your garden, nip the problem in the bud as soon as possible. The longer you wait, the more damage they’ll do and the harder they’ll be to get rid of.

Regularly check your plants for signs of pests and take action immediately if you see any.

Maintain healthy soil

One of the best ways to deter pests is by having healthy soil. Pests are attracted to weak and unhealthy plants, so by keeping your plants’ roots healthy, you’ll make them less appealing to pests.

Make sure you’re providing your plants with enough water and nutrients and that you’re not over- or under-watering them. You should also add mulch to your garden beds to help retain moisture and keep the soil healthy.

Create a barrier

Another way to keep pests out of your garden is by creating a physical barrier between them and your plants. This could mean installing a fence around your garden or using netting or…

Continue reading here